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. every year at the end of our national convention, we have the leaders of various national civil rights groups join us to talk about what they have done and we have done in the preceding year, what we have not been table do, and then what we commit to doing in the coming year so that we are held account to believe what we say. it is not enough to just convene, talk about things, show how smart we are, give our best sound bites, we must measure what we do, what we do not do, so that people will know that we are serious in our service to people. this year, we added, though, that with the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, we wanted some of those who have served above and beyond the call of duty for the last half century to assess where we are since the march where we need to be, where we have made progress and where we have gone backwards. so we have a special panel added this year that will put us in context and in focus. let me introduce the panel to my -- the panel. to my right, the reverend pastor of ron, the this church, first corinthian. he also chairs the ministers divisi
economist named peter, who is on the u.s. civil rights commission. they will testify about how illegal immigration can affect the u.s. economy. a hearing on friday. then on monday a second hearing. after that we have to see how the process unfolds. especially republicans on the judiciary committee are calling for more than the currently scheduled hearings. probably sometime in early may we will move to the markup process which is where the senators on the judiciary committee can begin offering amendments and releasing how they want to continue to shape the bill. we hope it gets passed out of committee and go to the senate floor. host: rebekah kaplan of the national journal. wilmington, north carolina, kathleen is on our democrat line. is roberta our guest aplan.rebecca caller: my biggest fear is that our country is in a state of fear. thing wehe worst could ever have as americans. we have based our country from the beginning of a great work ethic. there are so many things we could do instead of being frightened every time something happens. domestically, foreman, and immigration. we ha
. you would not have had it and not a series of civil rights pieces of sieve legislation pass given the way this senate operates. >> it's about leadership. david? >> i agree. >> on both sides of pennsylvania avenue -- >> we have had arguments on this show before about barack obama. i'm disappointed in him. i think he wasn't strong enough. i agree with, sadly, with maureen's column. >> i go back to what an ambassador from the middle east told me in year one about president obama. i thought he was extraordinarily moving at the state of the union. but said from the mistake they make, richard, i'm sure you heard this a lot. mistake they make at the white house in twine they blebelieve speech is the end instead of the speech the mean to get to the end. you start there. but you have to do the lyndon johnson, the george w. bush which is -- >> you think they are. the most salient fact in maureen's column is the person they are sending up to the hill is practically invisible. they think they are bending ears and doing politics but it's so ineffectual the result is what the result was. >> i'v
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3